Most recent Press Releases

  • Refining Breast Cancer Classification by Multiplexed Imaging

    An imaging approach developed at UZH enables the study of breast cancer tissue in greater detail. It uses 35 biomarkers to identify the different cell types in breast tumors and its surrounding area compared to the current standard of testing single markers. This increases the precision of tumor analysis and classification - and improves personalized diagnostics for breast cancer patients.

  • How Zebra Finches Learn to Sing

    Complex learning processes like speaking or singing follow similar patterns. Using the example of zebra finches, researchers at UZH and ETH Zurich have investigated how young birds imitate the courtship songs of their fathers and practice them thousands of times. The study has revealed what aspects of the song are remembered overnight, and that sleep allows the bird to optimally build upon the progress made on the previous day.

  • World Premiere in Zurich: Machine Keeps Human Livers Alive for One Week Outside of the Body

    Researchers from the University Hospital Zurich, ETH Zurich, Wyss Zurich and the University of Zurich have developed a machine that repairs injured human livers and keeps them alive outside the body for one week. This breakthrough may increase the number of available organs for transplantation saving many lives of patients with severe liver diseases or cancer.

  • Improved Functioning of Diverse Landscape Mosaics

    It is well-established that biodiverse ecosystems generally function better than monocultures. Ecologists at the University of Zurich have now shown that the same is true on a larger scale: Having a mix of different land-covers including grassland, forest, urban areas and water bodies improves the functioning and stability of a landscape – irrespective of the plant species diversity, region and climate.

  • Skin and Mucous Membrane Lesions as Complication of Pneumonia

    Painful inflammatory lesions of the skin and mucous membranes may occur in children who develop bacterial pneumonia. A research group at the University Children's Hospital Zurich has recently developed a new diagnostic blood test, which reliably diagnoses bacteria as the causative pathogen at an early stage, allowing more specific treatment and prediction about prognosis.

  • Newly Discovered Protein Gives Signal for Virus Infection

    Researchers at the University of Zurich have discovered a protein that enables adenoviruses to infect human cells. The Mib1 protein gives the virus the signal to uncoat the DNA and release it into the nucleus. Blocking this protein could therefore help people with weakened immune systems to fight dangerous viruses.

  • Nearly 12 Million Euros for Outstanding UZH Research

    Six researchers at the University of Zurich have been awarded ERC Consolidator Grants from the European Research Council. They will each receive funding of around 2 million euros for their research projects in the fields of economics, medicine and humanities.

  • New Migraine Medications Could Endanger Patients with High Blood Pressure

    New migraine medications block αCGRP, a neuropeptide which causes vasodilation, for example in the meninges. The very same peptide, which is formed in the muscles during physical activity, protects the heart – which is vital for people with chronic high blood pressure. The innovative migraine prophylaxis could endanger these people, as researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated in mice.

  • New Approach to Treating Incurable Leukemia in Children Discovered

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer affecting children in Switzerland and, unfortunately, is often incurable. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Children’s Hospital Zurich have now found a way to stop the driving force behind this type of leukemia at a molecular level and develop a targeted therapy.

  • Chinese Porcelain Art in Pale Green-Blue Shades

    With its shimmering manifold green and blue colors, celadon porcelain from the Chinese province of Zhejiang, which draws on a thousand year-old tradition, is currently undergoing a new resurgence. An exhibition at the Ethnographic Museum of the University of Zurich provides insights into the history, technology and knowledge of the craft in the celadon metropolis of Longquan.

  • Science Barometer Switzerland: Trust in Science and Research Remains High

    The Swiss population’s trust in science and research is high to very high. As the Science Barometer Switzerland 2019 study shows, people in Switzerland have a positive attitude towards science and are keen to receive information about research, with climate and energy considered the most important topics.

  • Private Banks Should Proactively Foster Sustainable Investments

    ustainable investments are on the rise, but does impact follow? The new UZH report on sustainable investing capabilities urges private banks to gear up their services to meet investor demands – and environmental targets. Most of the reviewed Swiss and European private banks should increase training of client advisors and offer more products with measurable impact.

  • Milk from Teeth: Dental Stem Cells Can Generate Milk-Producing Cells

    Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Zurich, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands. This could be used for post-surgery tissue regeneration in breast cancer patients.

  • Mindfulness Meditation Enhances Positive Effects of Psilocybin

    Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the clinical application of classic psychedelics in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Researchers of the University of Zurich have now shown that mindfulness meditation can enhance the positive long-term effects of a single dose of psilocybin, which is found in certain mushrooms.

  • Suspicions of Internet Monitoring Lead to Self-Censorship

    More than half of internet users in Switzerland avoid searching for certain terms or expressing certain views online because they believe they are being monitored. This is the conclusion of a representative survey conducted by the University of Zurich on internet use in Switzerland.

  • Antibiotics with Novel Mechanism of Action Discovered

    Many life-threatening bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to existing antibiotics. Swiss researchers co-headed by the University of Zurich have now discovered a new class of antibiotics with a unique spectrum of activity and mechanism of action – a major step in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. By disrupting outer membrane synthesis, the antibiotics effectively kill Gram-negative bacteria.

  • Marmoset Monkeys Can Learn New Dialect

    Monkeys and other animals communicate through calls that can differ depending on region. The common marmoset is one such animal that communicates using regional dialects. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that they even adapt their dialect when they move to a different area.

  • Protein in Blood Protects against Neuronal Damage after Brain Hemorrhage

    Patients who survive a cerebral hemorrhage may suffer delayed severe brain damage caused by free hemoglobin, which comes from red blood cells and damages neurons. Researchers at the University of Zurich and the UniversityHospital Zurich have now discovered a protective protein in the body called haptoglobin, which prevents this effect.

  • Raw Meat-Based Diets for Pets Pose a Health Risk for Humans

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are found in half of all dog foods made from raw meat, researchers from the University of Zurich have found. Feeding pets a diet of raw meat, also known as a "BARF" diet, is a growing trend. The resistant bacteria in the raw food can be transmitted to the pets - and thus also to humans.

  • The Brain Does not Follow the Head

    The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. This has to do, among other things, with the evolution of novel brain structures that enabled complex behaviors such as language and tool production. A study by anthropologists at the University of Zurich now shows that changes in the brain occurred independent of evolutionary rearrangements of the braincase.