Press releases

  • Deep Sleep Maintains the Learning Efficiency of the Brain

    For the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain. They have developed a new, non-invasive method for modulating deep sleep in humans in a targeted region of the brain.

  • Engineering heart valves for the many

    Harvard’s Wyss Institute and the University of Zurich partner to create a next-generation heart valve that accurately functions upon implantation and regenerates into long-lasting heart-like tissue.

  • XENON1T: the most sensitive detector on Earth

    “The best result on dark matter so far and we only started!”. This is how scientists behind XENON1T, now the most sensitive dark matter experiment world-wide, commented on their first result from a short 30-day run presented today to the scientific community.

  • Ernst Fehr is named foreign honorary member of the American Economic Association

    The most important organization of economists in the world, the American Economic Association, has named the economist Ernst Fehr from the University of Zurich as a foreign honorary member. He is thus the first scientist who conducts research at a Swiss university to receive this honor.

  • With Stem Cells to New Intervertebral Discs

    Slipped discs are the most common reason to go to the doctor in Switzerland. Not only people, but also dogs frequently suffer from this problem. An operation cures the painful consequences of a slipped disc, but the disc remains degenerated. Help is on its way: In a study with German shepherds, researchers at the Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Zurich have shown that stem cells may change this situation.

  • Extinction of Alpine Plants May Remain Undetectable for a Long Time

    How do alpine plants react to warmer climatic conditions? Due to their longevity, the plants may survive longer than expected in their habitats, but produce offspring that are increasingly maladapted. Population size may decrease faster than the contraction of the species range, as UZH researchers show using computer models. Scientists who wish to track the precise extinction risk of plant species must not only measure their dispersal, but also the densities of the local populations.

  • Comprehensive Atlas of Immune Cells in Renal Cancer

    Researchers from the University of Zurich have individually analyzed millions of immune cells in tumor samples from patients with renal cell carcinoma. They are now presenting an immunological atlas of the tumor environment for the first time, leading to possible further developments of immunotherapies.

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